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: the chicago board of education is expected to vote on the measure in may. declining enrollment has also forced other major cities like washington d.c. and philadelphia to close scores of public schools in recent years. we take up the debate now with two people at the center of the fight. we start with jesse ruiz. he's vice president of the chicago board of education. he was appointed to that post by mayor rahm emanuel in 2011. i spoke with him a short time ago. welcome to you, so why is such a dramatic action so necessary? is this resources, money, pure and simple? >> no. it is two-fold. one, we are looking at a record budget deficit of about $1 billion next year. so we're looking for every aspect to reap savings in our system. and we have underutilized schools as a result from it population loss in certain parts of the city of chicago. it's healthy for those schools to right size, to become fully utilizeed schools and combining under-utilizeed schools which garners savings we can reinvest and focus the resources we have in one school billion as opposed to multiple, partially used billions. >>
. and that brings us to education nation. which is part of an ongoing commitment by nbc news, to foster a national dialogue about the future of education in america. today education nation is on the road in detroit with he had nbc's education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> we want to talk about what's happening to the schools in michigan. but in detroit, we can't help but talk about what's happening in the city of detroit. joining me right now is the governor of michigan, rick snyder. and the news of the day is that on monday, your emergency financial manager for detroit is going to go to work. there's a lot of controversy around it. people are protesting, saying it's unconstitutional. that he's going to sell off some iconic pieces of the city in order to balance the budget. what do you say? >> well it is legal. this is a crisis. and we need to turn it around. and if you look at, we've had success with emergency managers. if you look at detroit public schools, they've had one for the last several years and we're seeing the kids learn better now. flint and pontiac have emergency managers, working
the department of education think it as good idea clothe one of the top three mass killers of the 20th century on the kid sec nun of their website. some say it is because they are stupid and other os say it is because they are dumben. a shocking story of something nun necessary for any one who lives in new york city. >> does one congressman think federal workers who haven't paid their taxes should be lined up and shot? stay tuned to find out. >> you are more like the fun free zone. >> i don't get it. >> it is a play on gun free. >> not the following? >> you know what? i'm not following you. go away. [ laughter ] >> let's welcome my goodness it's wonderful. wow. here with fox news anchor patti ann browne. the donna reid of 2013 and if commentary were math homework i would do him in the morning. bernie. my repulsive sidekick. >> bill: bill schulz. he brushes with a head hodge and garringles with mr. pibb. army special forces member kerry. should children learn a hook from the little redbook? on friday a day of the week barry the department of education website quoted the murderous former head o
big changes in the public schools. our chief education correspondent rehema ellis is in detroit tonight after an all day conference as part of our education nation initiative. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. detroit is like a lot of cities struggling with budget deficits and closing schools like the one behind me. proposed shut-downs in chicago are more and bigger than any city has ever attempted all at one time. outrage intensified as word spread. 54 public schools in chicago are slated to close at the end of this school year. >> my child has been here since he's been going to school. >> it's so sad to think that they are all going to be separated. >> reporter: the city is working to address a $1 billion deficit and says the closures could save $560 million over ten years. before it can save it has to spend. $223 million to reconfigure the schools absorbing new students. >> this policy is racist, classist and we have to continue to say that our mayor who is away on a ski trip drops this information right before spring break. this is cowardly. it's the ultimate b
on our department of education website? greg has details next. ♪ ♪ hey. they're coming. yeah. british. later. sorry. ok...four words... scarecrow in the wind... a baboon... monkey? hot stew saturday!? ronny: hey jimmy, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? jimmy: happier than paul revere with a cell phone. ronny: why not? anncr: get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its overall reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petrochemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's never been done before" simply bemes consider it solved. emerson. ♪ at a hertz expressrent kiosk, you can rent a car without a reservation... and without a line. now that's a fast car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. >>> washington, the pig story here is the vie produce bail-out. they are safe from bankruptcy, but at what cost? those with bank accounts will looking for government seizures above 40%. it's called bail-in. a leade
. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
on yields. investors are racing to the safe haven of things. almost any conversation about education ends up coming down to money. money is the reason behind the latest and largest school closures in our nations history. chicago is closing 54 schools. can you imagine? it's an effort to shore up the billion dollar budget deficit. as shocking as this sounds, cities are facing similar meesures are in your city could be one of them. could this actually be the best medicine? joining me n is the ceo of the illinois policy institute. >> and the 2010 census, 200,000 africans left and that has been a decades long time. many are declaring that the chicago public school system, which has monopoly control over educational systems is failing. they are leaving. we have these empty scols that have to be closed. melissa: it seems a liitle too easy. some people have been saying that the schools are empty, they are curable schools, is they're not going to be overcrowding? >> chicago's population is in a long-term decline. we have the lowest population that we have had since 1920. it was built from hundreds of
the seventh fittest economy in the world. we're ranked 34th in primary education and health care. our macro economic environment is 111th. that cannot be right. our next guest says the notion that we're losing our competitive edge is widespread and pervasive, it is not necessarily correct. ed mcbride is the washington bureau chief for the author of the special ro on america competitiveness. welcome, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> would you like to tell me, and i welcome the message that things are not as bleak as we've been told. please. talk us off the ledge. >> well, as you said, there is a the love hand wringing, a lot of reports. these dire statistic that's seem so dreadful. it is almost impossible to remember they're true. 111th? that's to do with the size of the national debt basically. but what all these gloomy sort of hand wringing accounts neglect, they focus on washington and on gridlock and on the failure to resolve all the questions about the budget and they don't look at what's going on in the rest of the country. the good news is, that in the rest country, people aren't s
is simply put, will my schools perform to the ability that my kids can get a great education? that is one of the challenges we took on. it is interesting -- a couple years ago before i was governor this because young woman who wisconsin in a community called milwaukee. milwaukee schools are some of the most challenged in the country. this was a first year teach who was named outstanding teacher of the year. she got noticed about that a week later she got a second notice. do you know what that notice was? she got laid off. they cut funding in education so when you have less money in those situations, even though she was named one of the best teachers in the state in her profession. she was one of the first to be laid off. why? under the old system of collective bargains, the last hired is the first fired. we not only changed collective bargaining we changed it so no longer senior or tenure, in our state we hire and fire based on merit rit. [applause] we're the ones who want to go forward. that is about being relevant. sometimes we can see the arguments on the other side. we're the ones who
subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion for transportation needs and $10 billion for infrastructure -- for an infrastructure jobback -- bank. as federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has said many times over the past few years, simply pursuing deep cuts in the short-term will slow the rate of economic growth and bring down revenues and lead to less deficit reduction. we have two paths before us. we can choose a path of austerity and indifference that will limit economic growth and increase inequality or we can choose one of inspiration and inclusion that invests in our country and creates opportunities for everyone. i choose opportunity over austerity an
in education reform. the've taken me around globe. i have seen firsthand the expose of economic growth in places like china, singapore, and brazil. in some of their cities on any given day, you can see dozens skyscrapers. when i return home, the mood is different. different, and worse. americans have the sense that our recovery is fragile. the greatest prosperity in a century will be enjoyed by other people in other lands, and not by our own children. tonight, i am here to tell you that this conclusion is 100% wrong. we potentially find ourselves at the threshold of our nations greatest century. we can, as reagan did, restore the great confidence of american progress and growth and optimism. tonight, as surely as you sit here, the fundamental are aligning in a way. it is there for the taking if we have the courage to grab it. and push the only problem that divide us today. consider the facts. take energy, with our new drilling technology, america will soon have an energy surplus. this is trillions of dollars in new wealth for americans. trillions of dollars. oreign-policy not overly in
you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing revenues appropriately, reforming tax expenditures to reduce they will on the equivalent of% o 7% or 8a year, thee myriad of tax expenditures in the tax code were able to find cuts. the senate budget in achieving additional deficit reduction is a balanced approach that will make us stronger, not weaker, and that's why it is my great hope that we will pass this in a significant way. i thank the chairman. i thank you, madam president. mrs. murray: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i want to thank the senators virginia and hawaii for excellent statements and really laying out the framework
not supporting the party, but they also knew there was no access or very limited access to elite higher education, that there was very little electoral representation, that there was extreme poverty, that there was not representation on the police force or in the political parties, they knew they didn't want the young activists who were standing up and doing something to get kill inside their bed and that that was of a threat to them as well. what the party did was articulate politics that not only drew support from more moderate black politics, but also drew support from other nonblack groups in the united states and internationally, and that support was crucial to being able to sustain on self-defense and the revolutionary imperialism of the black panther party as a source of power for change. i'm going to run through a few sort of examples of some of the allies here. this is, um, the young lords apparently, a puerto rican organization that emulated the black panther party in new york after they took over. they wanted to run a breakfast program and ended up doing a big takeover of a church in t
government at home and abroad. >> rand paul wants to accomplish the departments of education and congress and epa. >> small detail. >> and the federal reserve and abolish the income tax. the second amendment which does not allow in his opinion for any form of gun control whatsoever. he makes mitt romney look looks michael due dukakis. >> i paint in primary colors. >> these are details. >> they are details i would just as soon ignore. on some of those fronts. but, again, overall, the primary message that he delivers is less government at home and restraint abroad which you know what? the republican party has been reckless over the past decade. we have paid a lot for it with our philosophy. and so i think he's a good symbol like his father. listen. i voted for his father in the republican primary in 2012. did i agree with what he said about 9/11? >> god, i hope not. >> absolutely not. there are a lot of things that rand paul said i think are way out there and i disagree with, but the core issue of small government at home and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic se
for a fun and educational experience. since 1938 the derby has inspired thousands of the region's young people to learn the physics behind gravity racing and the engineering used to design soapbox racers. america's soapbox derby has been called the greatest amateur racing event in the world. and on june 15 it will continue to make history. the derby teaches sportsmanship, hard work and pride of accomplishment and it imbues its young participants with that same spirit of innovation that has long fueled america's greatness. young people who participate in these derbies are often sponsored by community groups, police departments, fire departments and others who want to invest in our country's future and a very direct and meaningful way -- in a very direct and meaningful way. every year i am incredibly proud of my constituents from maryland's fifth district who participate. a number of soapbox derby champions have come from the fifth district, including the 2009 s of the 2007, 2008, and last year. the winners in 2007 and 2008, kasey rader and courtney rail, respectively went on to win the
an expansion of engineering and science education, talks about reducing the deficit by eliminate willing waste. how concerned should the gop be about mark sanford's ability to win in the palmetto state now? >> i think they should be very concerned. she is a very impressive candidate in her own right. take away who her brother might or might nop not be or is. take away the baggage that mark sanford has, she is an impressive candidate on her own. an important point to make. that being said, it is likely that sanford will have challenges with women voters in a general election. newt gingrich won the primary. >> what are you trying to imply about our state? >> any time we predict what voters can do they go and do the exact opposite. >> especially in south carolina. >> exactly. no question. my point is even with all the things we are talking about, a tough race for sanford, she is such a strong candidate answered does have real baggage to deal w >> katon, you were quoted in politico, it looks to me like governor sanford has a tough hill to climb, not getting 40% have to convince people who didn't v
. they also knew that given there was no or very limited access to the higher education there was little representation and there was not representation on the police force of the fire departmendepartmen t or political parties. they knew they didn't want the young activists who were standing up and doing something and that was a threat to them as well. with the party did was articulate politics that not only choose support from more moderate black politics but also choose support from other non-black in the united states and internationally and that outlet support was crucial to be able to sustain self-defense and the anti-imperialism of the black panther party as a source of power for change. i'm going to run through a few examples of some of the allies here. this is the young party of puerto rican organization that emulated the black panther party in new york after they took over. they ended up having to take over a church in their neighborhood. working with many church members because they couldn't get space to run their breakfast program and it ended up that they got a lot of support
on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much the way all our conversations went. it is not thinking i would be getting christmas cards or anything else from him. i was not as a retired part of it is that got the strong impression when i would run into him that he viewed me as evil because of the gun issue. he had very strong opinions on the. [inaudible] [laughter] i'd found something on the gun issue he disagreed very strongly about and he viewed me as e
a sweep stakes model. smit: a big part is education; right? education of using the card in an appropriate fashion. why is that also a key -- a key promise of what you are doing? >> well, we're at an innovation conference, so many innovations and payments in the marketplace. what's challenging is getting consumers to understand the features and benefits getting them to adopt them. that's what pay perks is here for, educate consumers about what products and features are available for them and get them to use them in ways that benefit, again, the valuechain. shibani: dozens of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sherylout now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the v
to urge them to tell the public -- our job is to educate. it's the public's job to decide when they look on the grocery shelf or have the lever on a soda machine which thing to take, which product is in their interest. all we're trying to do is educate and then hopefully if they understand they would be better off with one product or another, they'll make the intelligent choice. >> you could do ads for education as the executive of new york city, you are telling people what they can and cannot do. why is that government's job to do that? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of 0 obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >> i do not think we shoul
come together and build new opportunities for housing to go in there. we could have adult education programs in there. we could have transitional opportunities for clinics. we could do a lot of things. let's not have a bunch of 52 plus buildings abandoned in our community. we do not need another eyesore. >> we're looking at the zool board voting on this on may 22nd. any chance of them turning back this decision? >> historically when they put out this list, and they put it out every year. we call it the hit list. they have carry through all the closings on the list. in the first six years there was something like 60 schools on the list. last year they were 22. they hit all 22. that being said, they've never done anything on this scale anywhere in the country. and so we're counting on a huge public outcry among people who are invested in the communities. parents, children, educators, all of us to make a stand and say don't do this in our city. don't dismantle our schools in such a scale. and we're prepared to make protests and speak out and hopefully the policymakers will change their
? and for many, will my schools perform to the ability that my kids can get a great education? it's one of the thing that is' important to be relevant. you see, a couple years ago before i was governor there was a young woman named miss sampson in wisconsin in a community called milwaukee where the milwaukee public schools are some of the most challenged in the country. and this young woman was a first-year teacher who was named the outstanding teacher of the year. she got notice about that, and about a week, week and a half later she got a second notice. do you think what that was? she'd been laid off. you see, under my predecessor, they cut funding for education, but they didn't give them anything in return to make up for them, so what happened? when you have less money in those situations even though she was named one of the best teachers in the state in her profession, what happened to her? she was one of the first to be laid off. why? because under the old system of collective bargaining, one of the last hired is the first fired. one of the great things you may not know about in ou
of it -- >> on the delivery end. >> hal: right. maybe their decision-making procession will be slightly more educated? >> yeah, i think there are a couple of things. i think hagel got nominated at least in part because a lot of the job of the secretary of defense going forward is going to be caring for the people who fought the two wars and having somebody who served the way he did is a good idea. and kerry was the obvious choice once the other thing blew up. >> hal: even before. but i also think it points to -- because he was always a good idea for it even with or without susan rice. he apparently wanted it it was not a -- obviously i think one of the reasons that republicans were so happy with it because they felt they could get an open seat to shoe horn scott brown back in. but here he is picking people for big cabinet positions that are uniquely qualified for the first time. >> yeah, and i think -- you know -- i mean i don't want get entirely sidetracked on this not on a day when mark sanford is back on the ballot -- >> hal: yeah. against stephen colbert's sister. >> no. >
) we weren't educated properly about the drugs. (woman) we are get told that it's bad for you and you don't hear anything else. (man)and yesterday we got into trouble because of (woman) there's no alternative like fair trade, or ethically friendly cocaine yet so we don't have a choice. >>yes, western societies have to take responsibility for the high level of demand in their er, amongst their citizens. if you're a cocaine user, you can either, confront the fact, and acknowledge that the commodity you buy comes from a dirty trade and has real ramifications down the line, or you can say well, to your governments, give me a legitimate way to buy this substance. people will always take drugs. we just need to manage that phenomenon in a way that is the best for society. [ music ] >> bill: hey, good morning, friends and neighbors. and a happy wednesday. wednesday, march 20th. great to have you with us here on the "full-court press" on current tv. wedge to the program. welcome to your program where you get to not only find out what's going on around the world here in our nation's c
and educational grants to train people how to be safe in using their guns, and also provide for an age level for young people not being able to have these guns. this is the way that america wants us to go. let us travel a pattern of saving jobs and preventing gun violence, intervening in the lives of those who need our protection. that's what this congress should be doing, providing the pathway for america's success. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? mr. rogers: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the speaker may postpone further proceedings on the motion to concur in the senate amendments to h.r. 933, as though under clause 8-a-1-a of rule 20. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. bjection is heard. objection is withdrawn. there is no objection, so ordered. the gentleman from contract seek recognition. mr. rogers: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r.
and innovation that relates to energy. it's about investing in education so that we are competitive and number one to build that, strengthens and sustains our commitment to our seniors, whether it's their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, billion, almost $100 $the 8 billion from pell grants, $100 billion from pell grants, and in the decade ends the is a job uarantee loser in the short-term and even more so in the long-term. so the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values to support of the middle class, which is the backbone of our democracy. again honoring the vows of our founders. the other a job loser ends the medicare guarantee and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. be - now our members will taking that message home about the contrast in budget priorities about the observance of the third year anniversary of health care, affordable care act, and what that means in the lives of america's working families. and in celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader until rome, pope f
the insurance they need or the subsidies they need to get educated. she is trying to gain sympathies here for rich preppy white house staffers that need to pay $7 for a nice meal in the cafeteria in d.c. and now they want to raise it to $10. is that what i'm getting from her? >> clayton: she says the quality of the food. if you look at the quality of the food, even lowering it it's still better than the school lunches most of our kids get to eat across this country. >> alisyn: you mean mystery meat? [yuck] >> peter: what was that pink slime they had coming out of tube. >> clayton: we used to have cheese dream take hamburger bumps the enriched flour ones break it in half and drizzle cheese ton and melt it and that was lunch. >> alisyn: that sounds delicious. the food i had in my cafeteria completely indefinable. it was just a sort of. >> clayton: jell-o. >> alisyn: gentlemen -- gelatinous. i think it was a kung pow chicken thing. let us know what the most heart breaking sequester cut you have heard is find us on twitter. are you on twitter? the neys are 49. without objection. >> the senate
of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. looks like we bothave a lot of catching up to do. well, visit pbskidsgo.org, where you can play a lot of games for your favorite characters, and win votes, too. well, go ahead, what are you waiting for? guys, i've been training -- i'm sorry. this is totally a blooper. (laughing) marcus... (laughter) >>> this is "nightly business report." >> moving higher. stocks finish on an up note. still on track for the best quarter in 15 years. >>> water, water not everywhere. how the on going drought is hitting texas especially hard and how it may get worse. >>> and too late or not? why there is still time to refinance your mortgage but you may not want toait much longer. all that and more coming up right now. welcome to our viewing. >> investors were back in the buying mood as stocks bounced back but still closed lower for the week. the dow snapped the streak of four straight winning weeks and the s&p 500 logging the second losing week in 2013. the markets got a lift on optimism out of cyprus combined with a batch o stronger tha expec
can appeal the decision to the board education and the state board of education. >> a vigil is planned for high school student hit and killed by a passing train in san jose. he was killed on tuesday, near a pedestrian crossing. he posted this video on youtube of him playing the guitar. the principal says he was everyone's friend. the 16-year-old was near but not on a pedestrian crossing according to san francisco. it has been ruled "accident." >> michelle shock is responding to the comment fromant gay comments during a performance in san francisco saying "i do not nor have i ever said or believed that god hates homosexuals and to those fans who are disappointed by what they heard or thing i said, i'm very sorry." half of the ought conference walked out after an antigay slur during her opinionance on sunday might. she said it was a description about how some people fowl. many of her shows across the country have new been cancelled. >> man madness is in full swing with both bay area participants in action. this morning, at 11:45, st. st. mary's plays in auburn michigan after middle tenne
, or defund education, they'll say we don't want to cut the entitlement programs, we want education paid for and so forth and so on and then they vote for the people who want to do the opposite. >> hal: yeah or in the case of rand paul eliminate the department of education. >> yes. i have become kind of the avatar for ashley judd even though i don't think that is accidental or that she wanted me to but people in kentucky tend to vote with people who they feel comfortable comfortable and not necessarily people they agree with. and i think that's why she has such a great chance at beating mitch mcconnell. because people are tired of mitch mcconnell. >> hal: in all fairness mitch mcconnell is not comfortable with mitch mcconnell. >> exactly. >> hal: he never seems to feel comfortable with himself. when nancy pelosi was speaker of the house, there were so many stalled bills that were worthwhile that were not getting through jnow there's the exact opposite. there is a stampede of republican bills that are never going to nakt the senate that are going to make it through.
. joining me now is karen lewis. with a welcome, i know your biggest concern, aside from a good education for these kids are your teachers of which a thousand could lose their jobs. let's talk about the timing of this. you have chicago mayor rahm emanuel. he did issue the statement over the past decade. this decision was delayed while we put more money into keeping buildings open rather than investing it where it should be, in our children's education. now we'll be able to better use funds for our children's future. >> i think it's a lovely talking point. and this is what this mayor does. he uses rhetoric that sounds reasonable. but if you unpack it, you find out that first of all, in this so-called billion dollar deficit, which of course is the press release deficit, it always changes later on. the actual amount of money this will cost, especially, if it's done correctly, which god forbid they've never done anything correctly before in terms of school closings. this will cost almost a billion dollars itself. so i don't believe any of this. rahm emanuel doesn't know the truth if it would
educated married mothers find themselves not uninterested in the conversation about having it all, but untouched by it. they are too busy minding their grandmother's old fashioned lives for values. like heirlooms and wear proudly as their own. joining the table is former news anchor campbell brown and editor and chief of "cosmopolitan" magazine and joanne coles is with us and also is katty kay. when you looked as thee numbers and sort of trend that you track here, what is behind it? is it a choice or reality? >> i think this is an economy story. these are not very affluent women who are educated in the ivy league who are fleeing their law firm jobs. these are women whose families are earn much less and in a world where our financial futures are uncertain and we don't know what is going to become of us and you're not making that much money and you've got two little kids and your husband is working all the time, it makes sense to lean out and focus on the home sphere. >> is that what you're finding the women that you interviewed, the one that you interviewed and the women you talked
. the future's bright but only if we educate the half truths and begin telling the real story of america's natural gas revolution. the stories about technology, private sector innovation, investment, financial risk, thousands of new jobs, new competition, new growth, a growing and better standard of living for more americans, lower energy costs, new industries, a revitalized energy sector, more jobs, more growth, energy security and optimism. this is the story of america's natural gas revolution. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized for ne minute. >> mr. speaker, the ryan budget once again places the burden of deficit reduction on working americans while failing to stop the frivolous spending of oil subsidies for companies that cost americans billions of dollars every year. ms. duckworth: i'm concerned that it will
-around you that could potentially be toxic to your body. education is key. if you have any concerns, as always, discuss them with your physician, those are my doctor's orders, thanks for joining us! [ crowd cheering ] [ applause ] ♪ >> (male announcer): live from the bay area this is the kron 4 morning news. kron 4 news at 4 starts now. >> good morning. it is friday march 22nd. we are taking a live look at the golden gate bridge. some days in it. not bad. >> let us find out about whether and traffic. us start with the weather. good morning erica. >> good morning james happy friday. we're starting off with clear conditions around the bay area. though winds howling over night. gusty winds from the coast the water. strongest from the north bay mountains. right now we are dealing with tippers in the '40's. not to bad of a start as we head into the afternoon. we will see plenty of sunshine. we could see low seventies for a handful of locations. >> letter to my id will be clear and mild temperatures back down to the '50s and '60s. >> looking at conditions. 40 degrees and napa. vallejo 3
on the state, education, general fund. >> new york and california, 100 percent goes to education. most of it is to -- pennsylvania all to senior citizens. veterans affairs, that teach thing. there are some states, like rhode island, where it can go into the general fund and the state can use it as its session. as i said, they have plenty of things to spend it on now. >>heather: so, do you think more states will consider having the lottery? >> they don't have any money. they are either going to raise taxes which is not popular at all or cut spending and they are doing all of those things. this has proven to be such a huge money maker for states. it's $20 billion more in just a few years they is earned. it is a lot of money. >>heather: you mention the payout of $4 2 billion in prize money and that was included because we were all offer it, and the payout included $587 million powerball jackpot in 2012 and now we have $338 million and already this year in 2013. >> but the winners do not get all that money. uncle sam takes his and it depends whether you take a lump sum. 80 percent choose t
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